Susan Philipsz is First Sound Artist Winner of Turner Prize

By on Dec 7, 2010 in Entertainment, Europe, Music, World Comments
Image credit: The Guardian

LONDON, England – Britain’s Turner Prize of 2010 goes to Susan Philipsz for her disembodied, recorded voice singing the 16th-century traditional Scottish song, Lowlands Away. According to international reports, Philipsz became the first sound artist Turner Prize winner on Monday, December 6, 2010. She took home 25, 000 pound ($40,000) for winning the award. The runners up receives a £5,000 award.

Philipsz bested other artists that includes:

  • Dexter Dalwood, an early favorite for his notable contemporary take on traditional history painting at Tate St. Ives;
  • Angela de la Cruz, for her work on a mangled, dishevelled canvas. Her work features a three dimensions through twisting and contorting the wooden frames to which her brightly colored canvases are attached. three dimensions through twisting and contorting the wooden frames to which her brightly colored canvases are attached; and the
  • Otolith Group composed of Kodwo Eshun and Anjalika Sagar, focused their work on reviving forgotten works of the past.

Unfortunately, noisy chants of protesters numbering from 60 to 200 students overwhelmed Philipsz acceptance speech at the Tate Britain gallery.  Chelsea College of Art & Design and Central Saint Martin students were protesting against cuts to arts funding. Philipsz expressed her sympathy and support for the student demonstrators who were not given the chance to join the London Awards ceremony.

Nicholas Serota, head of the Tate galleries that organized Turner Prize, also aired his support against government plans funding cuts as part of its austerity measure and cut its budget deficit.

The Turner Prize is an annual award given to artists, 50-year old and below, born in Britain working abroad or any artists based in the United Kingdom for their outstanding exhibition or other presentation. Other previous Turner Prize winners includes: Grayson Perry, a cross-dressing ceramicist, and Martin Creed, whose installation in 2001 featured lights going on and off in an empty room.



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